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Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean

Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean PDF Author: Taco Terpstra
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691172080
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 296

Book Description
How ancient Mediterranean trade thrived through state institutions From around 700 BCE until the first centuries CE, the Mediterranean enjoyed steady economic growth through trade, reaching a level not to be regained until the early modern era. This process of growth coincided with a process of state formation, culminating in the largest state the ancient Mediterranean would ever know, the Roman Empire. Subsequent economic decline coincided with state disintegration. How are the two processes related? In Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean, Taco Terpstra investigates how the organizational structure of trade benefited from state institutions. Although enforcement typically depended on private actors, traders could utilize a public infrastructure, which included not only courts and legal frameworks but also socially cohesive ideologies. Terpstra details how business practices emerged that were based on private order, yet took advantage of public institutions. Focusing on the activity of both private and public economic actors—from Greek city councilors and Ptolemaic officials to long-distance traders and Roman magistrates and financiers—Terpstra illuminates the complex relationship between economic development and state structures in the ancient Mediterranean.

Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean

Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean PDF Author: Taco Terpstra
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691172080
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 296
Book Description
How ancient Mediterranean trade thrived through state institutions From around 700 BCE until the first centuries CE, the Mediterranean enjoyed steady economic growth through trade, reaching a level not to be regained until the early modern era. This process of growth coincided with a process of state formation, culminating in the largest state the ancient Mediterranean would ever know, the Roman Empire. Subsequent economic decline coincided with state disintegration. How are the two processes related? In Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean, Taco Terpstra investigates how the organizational structure of trade benefited from state institutions. Although enforcement typically depended on private actors, traders could utilize a public infrastructure, which included not only courts and legal frameworks but also socially cohesive ideologies. Terpstra details how business practices emerged that were based on private order, yet took advantage of public institutions. Focusing on the activity of both private and public economic actors—from Greek city councilors and Ptolemaic officials to long-distance traders and Roman magistrates and financiers—Terpstra illuminates the complex relationship between economic development and state structures in the ancient Mediterranean.

Ancient Mediterranean Trade

Ancient Mediterranean Trade PDF Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 58
Book Description
*Includes pictures *Includes excerpts of ancient accounts *Includes a bibliography for further reading The concept of international trade was born in the ancient Mediterranean, which provided the perfect set of circumstances needed to produce an intricate trading system whose influence can still be seen in present-day economic practices. The ancient Mediterranean was home to a diverse range of cultures and landscapes, encompassing deserts, forests, islands and fertile plains. Different natural resources were available in different geographical areas, and with the advent of sailing ships around 3000 BCE, people were suddenly able to travel much further afield than ever before. This created an opportunity to trade local resources in international markets in exchange for exotic goods not available at home. At the same time, this shift in Mediterranean trade from a local to international scale was a catalyst for immense social, political and economic changes that helped to shape the course of Western Civilization as a whole. Starting with the Egyptians and Minoans around 3000 BCE until the decline of the Roman Empire at the end of the 5th century CE, ancient trade in the Mediterranean brought cultures into increasingly close contact with one another, and just as in the globalized world today, these cross-cultural influences came to shape the development of belief systems, languages, economics, politics, and art throughout wide expanses of land. Traders introduced foreign goods, but also foreign ideas and new methods of expression, and they in turn took new ideas home with them from the places they visited. Sometimes these mutual exchanges make it difficult to determine whether a particular process or idea originated from the buyers or the sellers, and in some cases the meeting of disparate cultures produced entirely new ideas unique from anything that existed in either culture prior to their interaction with one another. At the same time, interactions with foreign peoples also brought about new ways of viewing one's own identity. Ancient cultures could now be more clearly defined in terms of their differences from other distinct cultures. This sense of distance between the self and the "other" helped form national and communal identities, made famous by the ancient Greek identification of non-Greeks as "barbarians." Over the centuries, the profits generated from trade helped establish wealthy nations and fuel economic development across the sea. By taxing imports and exports, governments could afford large infrastructure projects, like the construction of roads and harbors, which in turn helped to further increase trade and wealth. As a result, wars were fought for control of important trade routes and to maintain access to crucial commodities such as grain and precious metals. Economics became a primary consideration when establishing government policies and dealing with international relations. Some cities, most notably Rome and Athens, even built empires on the back of their mercantile success. Furthermore, the question of how or why trade developed in the way that it did, and what kind of cause-and-effect relationship existed between trade, wealth and technology, can become similar to that of the chicken and the egg. Did the rise of wealthy civilizations create the demand for increased trade, or did successful trading give birth to wealthy civilizations? Ancient Mediterranean Trade: The History of the Trade Routes Throughout the Region and the Birth of Globalization examines how the systems formed and developed, the goods involved, and the impact it had on Europe, the Near East, and Africa. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about ancient Mediterranean trade like never before.

Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean

Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean PDF Author: Taco Terpstra
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691189706
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 296
Book Description
How ancient Mediterranean trade thrived through state institutions From around 700 BCE until the first centuries CE, the Mediterranean enjoyed steady economic growth through trade, reaching a level not to be regained until the early modern era. This process of growth coincided with a process of state formation, culminating in the largest state the ancient Mediterranean would ever know, the Roman Empire. Subsequent economic decline coincided with state disintegration. How are the two processes related? In Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean, Taco Terpstra investigates how the organizational structure of trade benefited from state institutions. Although enforcement typically depended on private actors, traders could utilize a public infrastructure, which included not only courts and legal frameworks but also socially cohesive ideologies. Terpstra details how business practices emerged that were based on private order, yet took advantage of public institutions. Focusing on the activity of both private and public economic actors—from Greek city councilors and Ptolemaic officials to long-distance traders and Roman magistrates and financiers—Terpstra illuminates the complex relationship between economic development and state structures in the ancient Mediterranean.

Trade in the Ancient World

Trade in the Ancient World PDF Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 180
Book Description
*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading The story of the Silk Road has been a popular topic amongst tourists, academics, economists, state parties, and daydreaming children for many centuries. In many ways the Silk Road can be seen everywhere, and it has existed for as long as people have traveled across Eurasia. Its impact is widely felt among the diverse peoples that live on the continent, through the unique regional art and architectural styles, as well as in countless films, books, academic studies, and organized tours devoted to the ancient trade routes. The concept of international trade was born in the ancient Mediterranean, which provided the perfect set of circumstances needed to produce an intricate trading system whose influence can still be seen in present-day economic practices. The ancient Mediterranean was home to a diverse range of cultures and landscapes, encompassing deserts, forests, islands and fertile plains. Different natural resources were available in different geographical areas, and with the advent of sailing ships around 3000 BCE, people were suddenly able to travel much further afield than ever before. This created an opportunity to trade local resources in international markets in exchange for exotic goods not available at home. At the same time, this shift in Mediterranean trade from a local to international scale was a catalyst for immense social, political and economic changes that helped to shape the course of Western Civilization as a whole. Starting with the Egyptians and Minoans around 3000 BCE until the decline of the Roman Empire at the end of the 5th century CE, ancient trade in the Mediterranean brought cultures into increasingly close contact with one another, and just as in the globalized world today, these cross-cultural influences came to shape the development of belief systems, languages, economics, politics, and art throughout wide expanses of land. Traders introduced foreign goods, but also foreign ideas and new methods of expression, and they in turn took new ideas home with them from the places they visited. Sometimes these mutual exchanges make it difficult to determine whether a particular process or idea originated from the buyers or the sellers, and in some cases the meeting of disparate cultures produced entirely new ideas unique from anything that existed in either culture prior to their interaction with one another. At the same time, interactions with foreign peoples also brought about new ways of viewing one's own identity. Ancient cultures could now be more clearly defined in terms of their differences from other distinct cultures. This sense of distance between the self and the "other" helped form national and communal identities, made famous by the ancient Greek identification of non-Greeks as "barbarians." Over the centuries, the profits generated from trade helped establish wealthy nations and fuel economic development across the sea. By taxing imports and exports, governments could afford large infrastructure projects, like the construction of roads and harbors, which in turn helped to further increase trade and wealth. As a result, wars were fought for control of important trade routes and to maintain access to crucial commodities such as grain and precious metals. Economics became a primary consideration when establishing government policies and dealing with international relations. Some cities, most notably Rome and Athens, even built empires on the back of their mercantile success. Trade in the Ancient World: The History and Legacy of Trade in Europe, the Near East, and Africa during Antiquity examines how the trade routes formed and developed, the goods involved, and the impact the trade routes had on Europe, the Near East, and Africa. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about ancient Mediterranean trade like never before.

The Ancient Mediterranean Trade in Ceramic Building Materials: A Case Study in Carthage and Beirut

The Ancient Mediterranean Trade in Ceramic Building Materials: A Case Study in Carthage and Beirut PDF Author: Philip Mills
Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd
ISBN: 1784910678
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 142
Book Description
This study addresses the level of interregional trade of ceramic building material (CBM), traditionally seen as a high bulk low value commodity, within the ancient Mediterranean between the third century BC and the seventh century AD.

Traders in the Ancient Mediterranean

Traders in the Ancient Mediterranean PDF Author: Timothy Howe
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780578174884
Category :
Languages : en
Pages :
Book Description


Cargoes from Three Continents

Cargoes from Three Continents PDF Author: Archaeological Institute of America
Publisher: Archaeological Inst of Amer
ISBN:
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 218
Book Description
A collection of teaching plans and related material designed to help teachers understand Mediterranean-centred trade between 1600 BC and AD 200.

Geographic Factors in the Ancient Mediterranean Grain Trade

Geographic Factors in the Ancient Mediterranean Grain Trade PDF Author: Ellen Churchill Semple
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : History, Ancient
Languages : en
Pages : 74
Book Description


The Open Sea

The Open Sea PDF Author: J. G. Manning
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691202303
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 448
Book Description
A major new economic history of the ancient Mediterranean world In The Open Sea, J. G. Manning offers a major new history of economic life in the Mediterranean world during the Iron Age, from Phoenician trading down to the Hellenistic era and the beginning of Rome's supremacy. Drawing on a wide range of ancient sources and the latest social theory, Manning suggests that the search for an illusory single ancient economy has obscured the diversity of the Mediterranean world, including changes in political economies over time and differences in cultural conceptions of property and money. At the same time, this groundbreaking book shows how the region's economies became increasingly interconnected during this period—and why the origins of the modern economy extend far beyond Greece and Rome.

The Triumph and Trade of Egyptian Objects in Rome

The Triumph and Trade of Egyptian Objects in Rome PDF Author: Stephanie Pearson
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 311070093X
Category : Art
Languages : en
Pages : 272
Book Description
From gleaming hardstone statues to bright frescoes, the unexpected and often spectacular Egyptian objects discovered in Roman Italy have long presented an interpretive challenge. How they shaped and were shaped by religion, politics, and identity formation has now been well researched. But one crucial function of these objects remains to be explored: their role as precious goods in a collector’s economy. The Romans imported and recreated Egyptian goods in the most opulent materials available – gold, gems, expensive wood, ivory, luxurious textiles – and displayed them like true treasures. This is due in part to the way Romans encountered these items, as argued in this book: first as dazzling spolia from the war against Cleopatra, then as costly wares exchanged over the expanding Roman trade routes. In this respect, Romans treated Egyptian art surprisingly similarly to Greek art. By examining the concrete mechanisms through which Egyptian objects were acquired and displayed in Rome, this book offers a new understanding of this impressive material at the crossroads of Hellenistic, Roman, and Egyptian culture.